Film Review: Kodachrome

Leave a comment Standard

54b3272b60145dacda3a860e789977f8

Kodachrome.

We’re all so frightened by time, the way it moves on and the way things disappear. That’s why we’re photographers. We’re preservationists by nature. We take pictures to stop time, to commit moments to eternity. Human nature made tangible.

Last night I found myself with an evening to myself. So after flicking through Netflix for what seemed like forever I stumbled upon this film. I remember seeing the trailer a while back and thinking “Oh that looks good”.

The film is about the troubled relationship between father and son, as they head across America to the only remaining place that can develop this specific photography film. – Which I am lead to believe is based on a true story, or at least the part about the photo shop having an influx of people as they stopped developing the film.

Netflix-film-960x430

It’s such a heartwarming bittersweet tale as we follow Matt (Jason Sudeikis) a music producer that is almost at the end of his rope within in his career and Ben (Ed Harris) his father, a world-famous photographer. Both actors hit their mark amazingly – it’s not a new role for Harris who has a list of talented roles under his belt, but it is refreshing to see Sudeikis take a step away from comedy and break into something with serious heart and drama.

Elizabeth Olsen supports the cast as Zooey, Ben’s carer who joins them for half of the journey. She is refreshing and of late I have started to really rate her (did you see Wild River).

The film had a strong “Into the Wild” feel to it, using similar techniques such as, a mix of amazing acting, moving story and subtle but undeniably fitting soundtrack of acoustic folk music. The whole package in my eyes.

Something like this shows we don’t need big action scenes, fire and car chases to entertain the senses. Strip it all back to basics and just run with a story and a handful of cast members. It works just as well.

trailer-for-netflixs-road-trip-film-kodachrome-with-jason-sudeikis-ed-harris-and-elizabeth-olsen-social

As the story goes on we learn more about the broken relationship between Father and Son, the hardships of adulthood and how life can change and develop (Camera Pun there. Sorry) without even noticing it. There is such a relatable tone to this movie that I still can not shift. It captivated me and did exact what “Into the Wild” did to me. And I am not too proud to hide the fact that by the end I was just laid there, tears in my eyes and emotionally lost for words.

The film ends as you would expect with this story, with the main characters looking at the photos that were the reason to drive across country. They didn’t know what was on the reel’s until this final scene which was captured so beautifully. Without going into too much detail ultimately that is the film – highlighting the fact that era’s and periods shift and change with the wind and the effects are with you forever.

If you looking for a really good feel-good film, or maybe you are just a bit lost and need some kind of therapeutic guidance this film is for you. Like I said I can’t stop thinking about it and I want to share it with as many people as I can. Go and watch it – you won’t be disappointed.

201dbab782cdb75f01ddf130af536207_700x259

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s